Anti-Drug Stuff

We all know that bad drugs are bad for you, so here is some good information about bad drugs, so you will be able to take good care of yourself, and avoid the bad things that happen to good people when they have bad information about bad drugs.


Web:

http://www.freevibe.com/
http://www.nida.nih.gov/drugabuse.html
http://www.theantidrug.com/


Anti-War-on-Drugs

If you are old enough, you can remember when it was cool to be anti-war (during "the War"). Well, since then, we have had a number of other, perhaps less minor wars, such as the War on Poverty. If you are still anti-war, here is another one you can protest against: the War-on-Drugs. Find out what people around the world are doing to legalize that which is illegal. (Personally, I think it would be nice if someone would start a War on Bad Taste or a War on Advertising.)


Web:

http://www.drcnet.org/
http://www.drugsense.org/
http://www.faqs.org/faqs/drugs/law-reformers/


Clinical Trials

Before a new drug can be approved, or before an old drug can be approved for a new use, a lot of careful testing must be done. Part of this testing involves clinical trials using volunteers. If you participate in a clinical trial, you will get to try a drug before it is released to the market. You will also receive free medical attention (including the drug). If you have a medical condition that is not responding to standard treatment, you may want to think about volunteering to take part in a clinical trial. If so, remember that you will be taking a drug that has not, as yet, been thoroughly tested, so you must be careful. Do your homework and check with your own doctor before you volunteer.


Web:

http://www.aegis.com/pubs/trials/
http://www.centerwatch.com/
http://www.clinicaltrials.gov/


Cocaine

Cocaine is a powerful central nervous system (CNS) stimulant. Its effects include increased alertness, decreased appetite, decreased fatigue, and -- what cocaine users crave -- an intense feeling of pleasure. In general, cocaine makes people feel powerful and happy. Unfortunately, cocaine is highly addictive, illegal, expensive and causes terrible side effects, both short-term and long-term. Cocaine is prepared from the leaves of the Erythroxylon coca bush, which grows primarily in Peru, Bolivia and Columbia. Here are some sites from which you can find out more about cocaine, such as its appearance, its effects (including during pregnancy), and a discussion of tolerance and dependence.


Web:

http://faculty.washington.edu/chudler/coca.html
http://www.cocaine.org/
http://www.cocaineaddiction.com/
http://www.erowid.org/chemicals/cocaine/
http://www.tcada.state.tx.us/research/facts/cocainefact...


Drug Addiction

How do you know if someone is a drug addict? If the person has a physical dependence on a drug and he experiences withdrawal symptoms when he stops taking the drug or decreases the dosage, he is an addict. True physical addiction occurs with various drugs, including narcotics and depressants (such as alcohol). Psychological addiction can occur with or without physical addiction. A careful reading of history will show you that drug addiction is not new. It has always been a problem. Since the 1960s, however, drug addiction has demanded a heavy price from our society. The combination of readily available high-quality drugs, organized crime, and lots of weapons on the street has proven to be devastating to many people, families and communities.


Web:

http://www.drugabuse.gov/
http://www.health.org/


Drug Chemistry and Synthesis

Where do you turn when it's late and you have a cold and all the pharmacies are closed? Check out this Usenet group and see if you can find a nice recipe for a decongestant or perhaps some LSD. That won't help your cold, but at least it will take your mind off your symptoms. Chemists and fans of chemistry chat about how drugs are constructed and synthesized.


Usenet:

Google Newsreader alt.drugs.chemistry


Drug Culture

There is an entire group of people who choose not to hang out in reality some of the time. Instead of going to Disneyland, they like to spend lots of money on chemicals that are illegal and bad for their health. Commune with members of the drug culture as they talk about various drugs, music to trip to, becoming one with nature, and with themselves.


Usenet:

Google Newsreader alt.drugs.culture


Drug Information Resources

I know what you are wondering. Did Harley put anything dangerous to my mental health in this book, or are these ordinary, harmless Web sites? To tell you the truth, with all the excitement of working on the book, I don't even remember myself. But seeing as the Internet is the most powerful interactive medium in history, what you need to be asking yourself is, "Do I feel lucky?"


Web:

http://www.adhl.org/druglos.html
http://www.drugfreeamerica.org/drug_resource/
http://www.drugwatch.com/
http://www.erowid.org/psychoactives/
http://www.streetdrugs.org/
http://www.trashed.co.uk/


Drug Pix

What do you do if you encounter objects that you suspect might be drugs or drug paraphernalia? I know someone who was engaged to a fellow who had been a drug addict. Supposedly, he had stopped taking drugs years ago. One day, she found a small, strange-looking pipe in his truck. She showed it to some friends who told her it was a cocaine pipe. He claimed that a "friend" must have left it in the truck. Needless to say, his fiancÚ status was terminated immediately. Drugs and the tools people use to get high come in many forms, and it can be difficult to guess what something is just by looking at it. Here are a large variety of pictures to help you make an identification.


Web:

http://www.drugs.indiana.edu/prevention/iprcpics.html
http://www.erowid.org/chemicals/lsd/lsd_images_gallery1...
http://www.ohsinc.com/photos_drug_photos_pictures_drug_...
http://www.prevlink.org/getthefacts/webphotoalbums/drug...


Drug Talk and General Discussion

There is a lot you can say about drugs, and the Internet has a lot of people who love to say it. And where else can you go for advice on what to do with a pot of leftover phenyl acetic acid or how to tell the difference between Amanita Muscaria, Psilocybe Cubensis and Chinese take-out? On the Net you will find wide-ranging discussions about a variety of topics: hard drugs (such as heroin and cocaine), psychedelic drugs (such as LSD and mushrooms), and soft drugs (such as marijuana and television). Turn on, tune out, and drop into the Usenet groups where "Better Living Through Modern Chemistry" is more than just a slogan.


Usenet:

Google Newsreader alt.drugs
Google Newsreader alt.drugs.hard
Google Newsreader alt.drugs.psychedelics
Google Newsreader alt.hemp
Google Newsreader rec.drugs.announce
Google Newsreader rec.drugs.chemistry
Google Newsreader rec.drugs.misc

IRC:

#drugs (DALnet, Undernet)

#lsd (DALnet)

#mdma (EFnet)

#pot (DALnet)


Drug Testing

Drug testing is certainly a double-edged sword (to coin a phrase). On the one hand (to coin another phrase), drug testing is a useful tool to help employers maintain a drug-free workplace. Be that as it may (to coin yet a third phrase), many people see the forced donation of bodily substances to possibly incriminate oneself as an affront to personal liberty. Would you like the real scoop on what may or may not be the lesser of two evils? (Wow, I just coined two phrases in one sentence.) Check out these Web sites, and you won't be left out in the cold. (Boy, I sure wish I had a Sacajewea dollar for every phrase I've coined.)


Web:

http://www.drugtestingnews.com/
http://www.erowid.org/psychoactives/testing/

Usenet:

Google Newsreader alt.drugs.drug-testing


Ecstasy

Ecstasy -- what a nice, tempting name for a drug. An intense, yet delicate labeling. However, unlike other well-known drugs -- such as Coca-Cola and television -- this is not one that you want to try at home. Contrary to what most people believe, Ecstasy (or MDMA -- metheylenedimethoxymethamphetamine) is not that new a drug. Read about the history, effects, dangers and usage of Ecstasy, the drug that will turn you into an Energizer Bunny with the brain of a sea slug. ("Coca-Cola", by the way, is a trademark of the Coca-Cola Company; "Ecstasy" is a trademark of the Republican National Committee.)


Web:

http://faculty.washington.edu/chudler/mdma.html
http://www.ecstasy.org/
http://www.erowid.org/chemicals/mdma/
http://www.tcada.state.tx.us/research/facts/ecstasy.htm...

Usenet:

Google Newsreader alt.drugs.ecstasy


Entheogens

A drug is a chemical substance used to alter the body's biochemistry so as to cause changes in behavior, metabolism or perception. A religious experience is a happening, feeling or realization during which one has the perception of transcending ordinary life and experiencing the divine. What do drugs and religious experiences have in common? Perception. Put them together and you have an entheogen: a chemical substance that can be used to induce a perception of the divine. Hmmmm....


Web:

http://www.csp.org/nicholas/spiritualindex.html
http://www.csp.org/practices/entheogens/
http://www.erowid.org/entheogens/
http://www.spiritplants.com/


Heroin and Opiates

Within 4-6 hours after his or her last dose, a heroin addict has begun to feel withdrawal symptoms: chills, muscle aches, joint aches, insomnia and nausea. About 10-20 hours later, those symptoms will have intensified and, by the time an addict has reached the 24-36 hour mark, he or she is experiencing insomnia, vomiting, diarrhea, weakness, depression, and hot and cold flashes. (You can see why a heroin addict will do anything to get the next fix.) Symptoms reach a peak at about 2-3 days. By then the person is experiencing muscle cramps, abdominal cramps, fever, severe tremors and twitching. These symptoms are often accompanied by incessant nausea and vomiting, and it is not unusual for an addict to lose 10-15 pounds (over 5 kg) in 24 hours. Withdrawal symptoms can take more than a week to disappear, and there may be a general loss of well-being that lasts for several months. Remember all of this the next time someone tries to tell you that heroin and other opiates are cool. Of course we all have differing tastes, and I would be the last one to impose my values on other people, but having to continually come up with large sums of money in order to avoid severe pain, vomiting and involuntary muscle contractions doesn't seem to be a pleasant way to spend one's brief time on Planet Earth.


Web:

http://www.erowid.org/chemicals/heroin/
http://www.sayno.com/opiates.html


History of Drug Laws

The use of drugs stretches back into antiquity, and follows a simple, general principle: if drugs are available, some people will use them, some people will sell them, and some people will regulate them. Our current drug laws have their roots in legislation developed in the late 1800s and modified heavily throughout the last 100 years. The only way to really understand why drug laws are the way they are is to have an appreciation of their history. By the way, speaking of drugs and history, has anyone else noticed that the guitar solo in the middle of the song "Just Like Me" by Paul Revere and the Raiders (1966) is a lot like the famous guitar solo in "25 or 6 to 4" by Chicago (1970)?


Web:

http://www.druglibrary.org/schaffer/library/histdrug.ht...
http://www.unc.edu/courses/psyc070d/druglaws.html


Leary, Timothy

The late Timothy Leary (1920-1996) was nothing if not an iconoclast. For example, he firmly believed that proper use of hallucinogenic and mind-altering drugs was necessary for experiencing an optimal existence. His philosophy was not that people should take drugs indiscriminately, but rather they should learn about drugs -- what they do and how to use them -- and deliberately choose what to take. In other words, where Nancy Reagan was fond of saying "Just say no," Timothy Leary would say "Just say know." In 1995, Leary was diagnosed with terminal prostate cancer and, until he died on May 31, 1996, he used his Web page to keep the world informed of his pre-death drug use (which was considerable). There was some talk of Leary committing suicide on the Net -- in real time, I assume -- but, in the end, he went quietly and peacefully, certainly not his usual modus operandi. One of his last goals was to "give death a better name or die trying". Even in final repose, Leary seems to have more to say than most living people.


Web:

http://www.deoxy.org/leary.htm
http://www.dromo.com/fusionanomaly/timothyleary.html
http://www.erowid.org/culture/characters/leary_timothy....


Marijuana

You probably know marijuana as a commonly used mind-altering drug of questionable value. However, there are many people who would like to see this drug legalized. They point out that marijuana is used medicinally by people with AIDS, glaucoma, cancer and multiple sclerosis. They also explain that hemp (the marijuana plant) is an industrial crop that can be used in the manufacture of paper, fiber, fuel and even food. Finally, in scientifically controlled studies, marijuana has been shown to increase the ability of volunteers to get the little beads into the eyes of the clown by as much as 54 percent. Need even more info? It's waiting on the Net. Just remember, however, as you make up your mind on this contentious issue, that long-term marijuana use causes many people to suffer from decreased ambition and mental acuity. On any particular day, using marijuana is somewhat innocuous. Over many years, it often results in significant lifelong consequences.


Web:

http://www.erowid.org/plants/cannabis/
http://www.hightimes.com/
http://www.marijuananews.com/
http://www.stonernet.org/

Usenet:

Google Newsreader alt.drugs.pot
Google Newsreader alt.drugs.pot.cultivation
Google Newsreader misc.activism.cannabis
Google Newsreader rec.drugs.cannabis


McKenna, Terence

Terence McKenna (1946-2000) was an ethnobotanist and writer who was as cherished in the old-style drug culture as the original big cheese, Timothy Leary. Unfortunately, McKenna died on April 3, 2000 of terminal brain cancer. On his deathbed McKenna said that he "finally understood that love permeates all that is, and it is the only real thing in this reality."


Web:

http://www.dromo.com/fusionanomaly/terencemckenna.html
http://www.erowid.org/culture/characters/mckenna_terenc...


Methamphetamine

Methamphetamine, or speed, is a central nervous system stimulant (that is, an "upper") that produces a variety of effects, including alertness and elation. However, speed is an extremely addictive drug that causes terrible side effects, damage, and often death, to the user. Speed was first synthesized in 1887. In the 1930s and 1940s, there was a significant speed problem, especially among soldiers during World War II. Later, another epidemic occurred in the 1960s. Today, speed is sold illegally and is a major cause of crime. In the street, speed is known by a variety of names such as meth, crystal meth, crank, glass and ice. This is a terrible, terrible drug. Stay away from it.


Web:

http://www.erowid.org/chemicals/meth/
http://www.focusas.com/Meth.html
http://www.kci.org/meth_info/links.htm


Nitrous Oxide

Nitrous oxide -- or laughing gas -- is a mild anesthetic that has been in use since the late 18th century. Today, it is most widely used by medical professionals for surgery and dental procedures. Of course, there are also people who use this drug for recreation. However, before you put your neurons on the line, you might want to check things out with your buddies on the Net. Remember, pleasure is not a laughing matter.


Web:

http://www.doitnow.org/pages/142.html
http://www.erowid.org/chemicals/nitrous/
http://www.resort.com/~banshee/info/n2o/


Nootropics (Intelligence-Enhancing Drugs)

I have a personal system for enhancing my intelligence: I exercise a lot, eat well, get plenty of sleep, read stimulating books, avoid television, talk with smart people whenever I can, and -- except when negotiating with editors -- do my best to think pure thoughts. Not everybody has such good habits, so it should come as no surprise that there is a lot of research into drugs that may be able to make you smarter. These drugs are called "nootropics" (from the Latin words for "doing your math homework").


Web:

http://www.erowid.org/smarts/
http://www.nootropic.com/refs/

Usenet:

Google Newsreader rec.drugs.smart


Pihkal

An acronym for Phenelthylamines I Have Known and Loved, Pihkal is a "love story" about a man and his favorite chemicals. Read excerpts from the book and see clever chemical breakdowns of everyone's favorite phenylethyl radical.


Web:

http://www.erowid.org/library/books_online/pihkal/


Politics and Drugs

Throughout history, people have been grappling with the problem of how to set rules for the legal use of recreational drugs, especially alcohol, and in the last century, marijuana. There are arguments on all sides, and the issues are anything but straightforward. Society must protect itself against the irresponsible use of drugs, even by individuals who feel that they should be able to do what they want with their own lives. On the other hand, in a democratic society, personal freedom is crucial, and the rights of the individual must be balanced against the needs of the many. So who is right? The politicians, the reporters, the teachers, the doctors, Dear Abby, your mother? It's hard to tell sometimes, so get your own information to help you understand the issues.


Web:

http://www.erowid.org/freedom/freedom.shtml

Usenet:

Google Newsreader alt.hemp.politics
Google Newsreader talk.politics.drugs


Prescription and OTC Drugs

There are a great many drugs used for medical purposes -- so many that even doctors and pharmacists have trouble remembering all the details and keeping up with new products. The next time you need information about a drug, the Net can help you find what you need. This information is the same data doctors use, so it is an excellent resource for all types of health care professionals. Hint: When you look up a drug, pay particular attention to the "indications and usage" (when and how the drug is used), the "contraindications" (when the drug should not be used), and "adverse reactions" (side effects).


Web:

http://my.webmd.com/drugs/
http://www.druginfonet.com/drug.htm
http://www.drugstore.com/pharmacy/drugchecker/
http://www.merck.com/pubs/mmanual_home/sec2/13.htm
http://www.nt.net/kirkphar/drugchecker.html
http://www.rxlist.com/
http://www4.health-center.com/pharmacy/


Psychedelic Drugs

Wow! Far out. Psychedelic drugs. I can't explain but, well, you just have to see for youself. I mean, it's like so, totally... you know. You can see a whatchamacallit. Wow! Far out. Wow! Like, cool. Totally.


Web:

http://www.cia.com.au/serendipity/dmt/pt_links.html
http://www.erowid.org/psychoactives/faqs/psychedelics_g...
http://www.lavondyss.com/donut/guide/toc.html
http://www.psychedelic-library.org/

Usenet:

Google Newsreader rec.drugs.psychedelic


Rohypnol

You are an intelligent, cultured woman out with a young fellow for the first time. All of a sudden, you feel dizzy and disoriented. Simultaneously you begin to feel too hot and too cold, and within a short time, you become nauseated. Well, you might just be getting the flu, but there could be two more sinister explanations. (1) Someone has slipped a dose of Rohypnol, the so-called "date-rape" drug, into your drink, or (2) you are on a date with a computer programmer. Rohypnol (the trade name for the drug flunitrazepam) is illegal in the United States, although it is used legally in many countries to treat insomnia. By itself, Rohypnol makes a person feel sleepy, relaxed and drunk for anywhere from 2 to 8 hours, effectively lowering his or her inhibitions. Combined with alcohol, the drug may cause the person to pass out and, upon awakening, have no memory of what happened. The blackout period can last from 8 to 24 hours. Thus, under the influence of Rohypnol and alcohol, a person could be raped and have no memory of the experience. Clearly, this is a drug to avoid. (Computer programmers, on the other hand, can be tolerated safely in low doses.)


Web:

http://faculty.washington.edu/chudler/roof.html
http://www.gmu.edu/facstaff/sexual/rohypnol.html#rohypn...
http://www.streetdrugs.org/rohypnol.htm


Street Drug Slang

We all know that seemingly innocent words can have other, more sinister meanings. If you get out on the street and start messing around in the world of drugs, one wrong word in the wrong place can have serious repercussions. Let's say your spouse sends you down to the store for some jelly beans, and, to save time, you buy some off a fellow in the street. You may have inadvertently copped a bag full of chloral hydrate (knock-out tablets). Imagine your embarrassment. Next time, check with the Net first.


Web:

http://www.addictions.com/slang.htm
http://www.drugs.indiana.edu/slang/
http://www.whitehousedrugpolicy.gov/streetterms/