Age of Innocence

American author Edith Wharton (1862-1937) is best known for her short novel "Ethan Frome" (1911). Wharton was born in New York, and although her family was wealthy, she, being a girl, was not educated formally. However, she dreamed about becoming a writer and, during her lifetime, she wrote seventeen novels, tens of short stories, and many articles and poems. To get you started, I have selected the novel I think you will enjoy the most, "The Age of Innocence" (1920), for which Wharton won a Pulitzer Prize. "The Age of Innocence" is satirical, witty, poignant and subtle. As you read it, be aware that Wharton was writing about the New York society to which she herself belonged.


Web:

http://www.bibliomania.com/0/0/56/101/frameset.html
http://www.litrix.com/ageinn/agein001.htm


Arabian Nights

The "Arabian Nights" are a collection of fairy tales originating in Persia, Arabia and Asia. Originally the tales were not intended for children, but were told by bold and dramatic entertainers who made their living telling stories. The stories were passed on orally until the 14th-16th centuries when they were translated into French and English and were finally written down. The most well-known tale of the "Arabian Nights" is that of Aladdin and his lamp. The lamp, when rubbed, brought forth a genie who would do Aladdin's bidding. Another well-known hero and adventurer of the "Arabian Nights" was Sinbad, who had seven amazing sea voyages. At these Web sites you can read all the stories of the "Arabian Nights", including the adventures of Aladdin and Sinbad.


Web:

http://mfx.dasburo.com/an/a_index.html
http://www.arabiannights.org/index2.html
http://www.ibiblio.org/pub/docs/books/gutenberg/etext94...


Around the World in Eighty Days

"Around the World in Eighty Days" (1873) is one of many wonderful adventure novels written by the French author Jules Verne (1828-1905), the founder of modern science fiction. The novel tells the story of an eccentric, taciturn Englishman named Phileas Fogg, a man of strict habits. One day at his club, over a game of bridge, Fogg asserts that it is possible to travel around the world in eighty days. (Remember, this is before the days of airplanes, automobiles and fast trains.) Fogg's friends disagree, so, to prove his point, Fogg offers to bet a large sum of money that he can undertake such a journey successfully -- all it requires is careful planning. "The unforeseen does not exist," he asserts. Fogg embarks on the journey with his trusty servant Jean Passepartout. Will he make it? What adventures will he have along the way? This is a book you will enjoy immensely; and when you are finished, you will want to read more of Verne's fifty-four novels, including "Journey to the Center of the Earth" (1864), "From the Earth to the Moon" (1865), and "Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea" (1869).


Web:

http://www.bibliomania.com/0/0/55/100/frameset.html
http://www.literature.org/authors/verne-jules/eighty/


Art of War

The "Art of War" was written by a great Chinese general named Sun Tzu about 500 B.C. The book was written as an instruction manual, and is the oldest existing work describing the principles of war and military strategy. The teachings of the "Art of War" are of universal significance, and can be seen as wise strategies for many types of human interaction. In particular, you'll find a lot to help you with your business and personal life. For example: "...to fight and conquer in all your battles is not supreme excellence; supreme excellence consists in breaking the enemy's resistance without fighting." See what I mean? Hot stuff. Just make sure you read it before your boss does.


Web:

http://www.kimsoft.com/polwar.htm
http://www.marxists.org/reference/archive/sun-tzu/works...


Canterbury Tales

Geoffrey Chaucer (c. 1340-1400) was an English poet who wrote "The Canterbury Tales", a 17,000-line poem about a group of pilgrims traveling to see the shrine of St. Thomas Ó Becket at Canterbury. The Tales are fascinating because Chaucer is a master storyteller who creates characters that are full of life. "The Canterbury Tales" is an unfinished work, but shows a delightful slice of 14th-century English life.


Web:

http://www.litrix.com/canterby/cante001.htm
http://www.luminarium.org/medlit/chaubib.htm


Christmas Carol

"Bah!" said Scrooge. "Humbug!" His nephew had just volunteered "A merry Christmas, uncle! God save you!", but miserly Ebenezer Scrooge doesn't think much of the idea. It has been seven years to the day since Scrooge has buried his old partner Jacob Marley, also a miser. However, Scrooge has no time for anniversaries, or Christmas for that matter. There is work to be done and sentiment and charity are a waste of time. But--that night, Scrooge is awakened by the ghost of Marley, who warns him of what happens to people like them after death ("No rest, no peace. Incessant torture of remorse"). Later in the night, Scrooge is visited by three more spirits, the Ghosts of Christmas Past, Christmas Present and Christmas Yet to Come. They take him on a strange journey, at the end of which Scrooge has undergone a spiritual conversion. He is now ready to celebrate Christmas and help his fellow man, including Tiny Tim, the young, crippled son of Bob Cratchit. ("God bless us every one," says the young tyke.) English writer Charles Dickens (1812-1870) was a prolific and popular novelist. If you would like to become acquainted with his work, there is no better place to start than with "A Christmas Carol". (Want some trivia? Scrooge's old sweetheart was named Belle.)


Web:

http://www.bibliomania.com/0/0/19/35/frameset.html
http://www.literature.org/authors/dickens-charles/chris...
http://www.litrix.com/ccarol/ccaro001.htm


Civil Disobedience

Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862) was an American essayist and poet who believed in "living deep and sucking out all the marrow of life". His best-known book is "Walden". Thoreau's essay "Civil Disobedience" emphasizes the idea of passive resistance against social organization.


Web:

http://sunsite.berkeley.edu/Literature/Thoreau/CivilDis...
http://www.cs.indiana.edu/statecraft/civ.dis.html
http://www.eserver.org/thoreau/civil.html


Communist Manifesto

"The Communist Manifesto" was written by Karl Heinrich Marx (1818-1883) and Friedrich Engels (1820-1895). Written in 1848, "The Communist Manifesto" demonstrated Marx and Engel's view of the class struggle and the need to strengthen the solidarity of the working people.


Web:

http://csf.colorado.edu/psn/marx/Archive/1848-CM/cm.htm...
http://www.hnet.uci.edu/history/mposter/syllabi/reading...


David Copperfield

The novel "David Copperfield", written by English author Charles Dickens (1812-1870), relates the story of an orphan named David Copperfield, following him from his school days through his adulthood. The story is told by Copperfield himself as a grown man, looking back over his youth. (In fact, it is the first novel that Dickens wrote entirely in the first person.)

To Dickens, "David Copperfield" was a special novel -- his personal favorite -- and, as you might guess, the book is semi-autobiographical. When Dickens was a boy of 12, his father was sent to debtor's prison, plunging the family into deep poverty. As a result, young Charles had to quit school for several years and was forced to work in a boot-blacking factory. Thus, it is no surprise that the story of David Copperfield relates the grim life of the child laborer during the Industrial Revolution.

Ultimately, however, the story is an inspiring one as David, undergoing one misadventure after another, is finally able to overcome the twists of fate and achieve success, both in work (as a writer) and in love (after his first wife dies). However, a lot happens between here and there, and along the way, our hero meets a large variety of memorable characters, including Mr. Micawber, Mr. Peggotty and Uriah Heep.

Dickens originally published "David Copperfield" as a serial, from May 1849 through November 1850. At first, sales were slow but, in time, the book became one of Dickens's most successful, second only in popularity to "The Pickwick Papers".


Web:

http://www.bibliomania.com/0/0/19/1992/frameset.html
http://www.ellopos.net/dickens/copperfield.htm
http://www.literaturepage.com/read/davidcopperfield.htm...


Don Quixote

"Don Quixote", published in 1615, was written by the Spanish novelist Miguel de Cervantes (1547-1616). In the story, Don Quixote, the hero, travels with his squire, Sancho Panza, and has many comical adventures. Quixote, who has become delusional from reading too many romances, believes he is a knight who must revive the age of chivalry. The novel "Don Quixote" has contributed significantly to our cultural traditions. For example, it has brought us the sayings: "Give the devil his due" (meaning that you should be willing to admit there is some good in people you dislike); "The proof of the pudding is in the tasting" (the best way to evaluate something is by using it); and "Honesty is the best policy" (honesty is more effective than deception).


Web:

http://www.encyclopediaoftheself.com/classic_books_onli...
http://www.ibiblio.org/pub/docs/books/gutenberg/etext97...
http://www.okanagan.net/okanagan/EQuijote/Index.html


Dracula

The English novelist Bram Stoker (1847-1912) wrote many novels, short stories, essays and lectures. Almost a hundred years after his death, however, Stoker is remembered for only one book, "Dracula" (1897). The story takes place in Transylvania (now a part of Romania), and begins when a clerk, named Harker, calls upon Count Dracula at his castle, in order to transact some business. (You'd think Harker would be a tad suspicious. I mean, Count Dracula in a castle in Transylvania? Come on.) Anyway, while at the castle, Harker begins to notice strange occurrences. The local townspeople refuse to approach the castle, the Count's reflection is not visible in a mirror, and so on. Life moves on. Count Dracula is revealed as a vampire who must drink blood to survive. A young woman becomes ill when blood is sucked out of her. Later she dies and becomes a vampire herself (technically, "un-dead"). In other words, lots of good, clean fun. By the way, have you ever noticed how vampirism is laced with sexuality? This is because the act of sucking blood is both male (penetration of the teeth) and female (accepting blood into the mouth). Like I said, lots of good, clean fun.


Web:

http://www.bibliomania.com/0/0/47/frameset.html
http://www.literature.org/authors/stoker-bram/dracula/
http://www.litrix.com/dracula/dracu001.htm


Frankenstein

If you have ever felt that a monster who wants only companionship deserves your compassion, you have understood the theme of "Frankenstein, or, The Modern Prometheus" (1818), a novel written by English author Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley (1797-1851), the wife of poet Percy Bysshe Shelley. The book tells the story of a scientist named Victor Frankenstein who takes assorted bones and other spare parts from a graveyard and, using a secret "galvanic process", tries to create life. Instead, he ends up with a monster, so ugly, that Frankenstein abandons it immediately. (Interestingly enough, Shelley never refers to the monster by name.) Throughout the story, the monster struggles to create a life for himself. He tries, unsuccessfully, to become part of a family, and then implores Frankenstein to at least make him a companion, so he won't be so lonely. (The scientist refuses.) Eventually, the monster becomes more and more angry and violent and, well, I bet you can guess what happens. Or can you? (Want to hear something real cool? When Mary Shelley wrote "Frankenstein" she was only 18 years old.)


Web:

http://www.bibliomania.com/0/0/43/82/frameset.html
http://www.literature.org/authors/shelley-mary/frankens...
http://www.litrix.com/frankstn/frank001.htm


Great Expectations

"Great Expectations" (1861) was written by English novelist Charles Dickens (1812-1870). The book tells the story of Pip (Philip Pirrip) and how he grows over the years to fit into society. As a young lad, Pip knows right from wrong, but has no understanding of why he must be good. As he grows older, Pip is corrupted and becomes amoral. Eventually, he matures and develops a sense of personal morality based on experience and knowledge.


Web:

http://www.bibliomania.com/0/0/19/37/frameset.html
http://www.literature.org/authors/dickens-charles/great...
http://www.litrix.com/grtex/grtex001.htm


Gulliver's Travels

"Gulliver's Travels" (1726) is the account of an Englishman, Lemuel Gulliver, writing about his various travels and adventures. Along the way, some of the places Gulliver visits are Lilliput, where the people are six inches tall; Brobdingnag, inhabited by 70-foot giants; and the country of the Houyhnhnms, intelligent horses who keep human brutes, named Yahoos, as a source of labor. Read "Gulliver's Travels" today, and you will judge its author, the Irish-born English writer Jonathan Swift (1667-1745), to be an excellent storyteller with a gift for fantasy. However, what Swift wrote was actually a thinly veiled satire lampooning the English political, social and legal systems of his day. For example, at one point, we learn about civil wars in Lilliput that were caused by a disagreement between the Big-Endians, who break soft-boiled eggs at the large end, and the followers of the Emperor who are commanded to break their eggs at the small end. This passage is meant as a comment on the schism created when Henry VIII broke with the Roman Catholic Church. (Note: Within computer science, "big-endian" and "little-endian" are used to describe two opposite ways of storing data, although, I imagine, few computer scientists know the origin of these terms.)


Web:

http://www.jaffebros.com/lee/gulliver/contents.html
http://www.litrix.com/gulliver/gulli001.htm


Heart of Darkness

"Heart of Darkness" (1902) tells the story of Marlow, a mariner who travels on a long river voyage into the interior of Africa looking for a man named Kurtz. "Heart of Darkness" is an adventure story in which a man's journey turns into a search for himself that forces him to confront the dark side of his existence. There is good and evil in each of us, we come to learn, and it is our choices that ultimately steer us toward or away from moral deterioration. This short, brilliant novel was written by Joseph Conrad (1857-1924), a British author born in Polish Ukraine. ("Heart of Darkness" was the inspiration for the movie "Apocalypse Now".)


Web:

http://sunsite.berkeley.edu/Literature/Conrad/HeartOfDa...
http://www.acsu.buffalo.edu/~csicseri/
http://www.litrix.com/hartdark/hartd001.htm


Jane Eyre

"Jane Eyre" (1847), another sparkler from those jolly BrontŰ girls, is a darkly passionate novel of love and betrayal. Written by Charlotte BrontŰ (1816-1855), the novel tells the story of Jane, one of the most independent, intelligent heroines in English literature, a governess who works for the moody, sardonic Edward Rochester. Jane falls in love; Rochester proposes; and then she finds out he is already married -- to an insane woman. Eventually, they are able to marry, but as in real life, getting there is one-half to two-thirds of the fun.


Web:

http://www.literature.org/authors/bronte-charlotte/jane...
http://www.litrix.com/janeeyre/janee001.htm


Lady Chatterley's Lover

The English writer D.H. Lawrence (1885-1930) had the distinction of writing a novel that was banned in both Great Britain and the United States. The book, "Lady Chatterley's Lover" (1928), tells the story of a love affair between Constance Chatterley, the wife of a paraplegic aristocrat, and Mellors, the game-keeper on the Chatterley estate. ("He stared straight into Connie's eyes, with a perfect, fearless, impersonal look...") Lawrence is a masterful writer, who not only plumbs the deep chasms of human emotion and desire, but describes the resulting physical relationship explicitly, earning him the enduring gratitude of high school students everywhere, who are pleasantly surprised to find such an earthy book on their list of required reading.


Web:

http://rishi.serc.iisc.ernet.in/books/Fiction/dhl/chat/
http://www.bibliomania.com/0/0/32/68/frameset.html


Les MisÚrables

"Les MisÚrables" (1862) is a 5-volume novel, written by French author Victor Hugo (1802-1868). Since the book's initial publication (in French), it has continually found a large and appreciative audience. Over the years, "Les MisÚrables" has been translated into a variety of languages and has been dramatized many times, most recently as a musical (1985), and as a TV miniseries (2000).

Why should there be such appeal for a long, detailed story that takes place in 19th century France? The answer lies in Hugo's ability to combine expert storytelling with timeless, universal themes.

The title "Les MisÚrables" (literally, "the wretched ones") refers to two types of people: the miserable vagrants who live on the streets of Paris, and the scoundrels who undermine the fabric of society by cheating, lying and stealing. The protagonist, Jean Valjean, typifies both: he is a thief who has just been released from prison, after serving 19 years for stealing a loaf of bread. (At the time, the French legal system considered such offenses to be crimes against the entire community. Hence, all thefts, no matter how small, were punished severely.)

Although he has served his time, Valjean is branded an ex-convict and finds himself, once again, on the street, suffering in poverty. He is befriended by a kind, gentle man, Bishop Myriel, from whom he steals some silverware. Once again, Valjean is caught but, this time he gets a reprieve. In an act of compassion, Myriel tells the police that he gave the silverware to Valjean voluntarily.

Valjean is overwhelmed by the gesture and, with Myriel's encouragement, he is inspired to reform. He travels to a new town where he makes a fresh start, becoming a successful manufacturer, which brings prosperity to the town. In time, Valjean even becomes the town's mayor. However, as you might expect, Valjean's past eventually catches up with him -- with unfortunate consequences.

The book goes on and on (through five volumes!) chronicling the lives of Valjean and other characters, not unlike a complicated French soap opera. I don't want to ruin the story by telling you too many details: after all, "Les MisÚrables" is one of the most widely read novels of all time, so I know you will like it, once you get into it. What I do want to point out is that "Les MisÚrables" is more than a narrative: it is an inspirational plea for moral change, both on a personal and social level. On a personal level, we are inspired by watching Valjean change for the better, redeeming himself as a human being. On a larger scale, we are led to ponder whether or not a country suffering from poverty and injustice can redeem itself politically through revolution.


Web:

http://ofcn.org/cyber.serv/resource/bookshelf/lesms10/
http://www.litrix.com/lesmisbl/lesmi001.htm
http://www.mv.com/users/ang/fanfic/


Little Women

"Talent isn't genius, and no amount of energy can make it so." This is just one of the many insights into human nature you will find in "Little Women" (1868). Written by the American novelist Louisa May Alcott (1832-88), "Little Women" is one of the most popular girls' books ever written, a mostly autobiographical story of the life of four sisters (Meg, Jo, Beth and Amy) growing up in nineteenth century New England. The book has two sequels, "Little Men" (1871) and "Jo's Boys" (1886). Alcott should never be dismissed as only a children's book author. Her writing has a power and beauty that rivals that of Dickens, whom she much admired and emulated. (Note to guys: One day you will be talking to a woman and the topic will shift to "Little Women". At this point, even if you have never read the book, I want you to say, "You know, of all the sisters, the one who has always reminded me the most of you is Jo." Take my word for it. This is always the right thing to say.)


Web:

http://www.eserver.org/fiction/little-women.txt
http://xroads.virginia.edu/~hyper/alcott/lwtext.html


Moby Dick

"Moby Dick, or, The Whale", written by American novelist Herman Melville (1819-1891), is a long, adventure story, set in the high seas in the early nineteenth century. The story is related by a narrator named Ishmael, a schoolteacher looking for adventure. Ishmael meets a harpooner named Queequeg and, together, they sign up to work aboard the whaling ship Pequod, commanded by the mysterious Captain Ahab. At first, the ship is managed by the first and second mates, Starbuck and Stubb. It is only after several days at sea that Ahab shows himself and reveals the real purpose of the voyage: to hunt down and kill Moby Dick, the legendary white whale who, in a previous encounter, had relieved the captain of one of his legs. Ishmael and the rest of the crew have various adventures, as the extent of Ahab's obsession with Moby Dick becomes evident. Eventually, they catch up with the whale ("...there she blows! - there she blows! A hump like a snowhill! It is Moby Dick!") and the book reaches its climax. On the surface, "Moby Dick" is a superb adventure story. However, the quest for domination is really a complex allegory. Moby Dick, the great white whale, represents evil, while Ahab's obsession to destroy Moby Dick represents an even greater evil. Thus, the book actually chronicles the struggle between good and evil, as well as the influence of the unseen powers, such as God and the Devil, that affect mankind (all of which you will find especially meaningful if you happen to be an eighteenth-century Calvinist). "Moby Dick" was published in 1851, but was not recognized as a masterpiece until 30 years after Melville's death. (Fortunately, I don't have to worry about that with my work. This book is scheduled to be recognized as a masterpiece any day now.)


Web:

http://etext.library.adelaide.edu.au/m/m53m/
http://www.bibliomania.com/0/0/36/2004/frameset.html
http://www.litrix.com/mobydick/mobyd001.htm


O. Henry Short Stories

O. Henry was the pen name for the beloved American author William Sydney Porter (1862-1910), who wrote over 300 short stories. O. Henry can rightly be considered the dean of American short story writing. Each year, since 1918, an annual O. Henry Memorial Award has been given to the best writer of a short story published in an American or Canadian magazine. O. Henry's most well-known story is "The Gift of the Magi", which relates how a young impecunious couple, Della and Jim, sacrifice their most valuable possessions in order to buy Christmas presents for one another. My personal favorite is "The Ransom of Red Chief", the story of an abortive attempt by two kidnappers to hold a thoroughly obnoxious child for ransom. It is impossible to read this story without laughing out loud, so when you do so, be sure you are at work (so everyone else will get nervous, thinking that you know something important that they don't).


Web:

http://www.classicreader.com/toc.php/sid.6/aut.123/
http://www.litrix.com/magi/magi001.htm


Oedipus Trilogy

Sophocles (c. 496-406 B.C.) was a Greek tragic poet who was an innovator in the history of drama, introducing ideas such as expanding the chorus and introducing scene paintings. The Oedipus Trilogy centers around a young man named Oedipus who was destined to murder his father and marry his mother. I don't want to spoil it for you by telling you how the story turns out.


Web:

http://sailor.gutenberg.org/etext92/oedip10.txt
http://www.eserver.org/drama/sophocles/oedipus-trilogy....


Paradise Lost

John Milton (1608-1674) was an English poet who wrote a great deal of work about religious ideas and philosophy and was a strong voice in various church reforms. "Paradise Lost" is an epic poem about Satan's rebellion against God, and the story of Adam and Eve in the Garden.


Web:

http://www.literature.org/authors/milton-john/paradise-...
http://www.paradiselost.org/
http://www.triton.edu/depts/uc/files/plboss10.html


Picture of Dorian Gray

"The Picture of Dorian Gray" (1891) is the only novel written by the Irish-born author Oscar Wilde (1854-1900). The story concerns Lord Henry, a pithy, witty, sardonic aristocrat, and his relationship with a very handsome young man named Dorian Gray. "I like persons better than principles," says Lord Henry, "and I like persons with no principles better than anything else in the world." Henry makes Dorian Gray's acquaintance, and over a period of time, manages to indoctrinate the young man into a life of sensual decadence, leading to... Well, you'll just have to see for yourself. The book is beautifully written, and I know you will enjoy the many epigrams scattered far and wide by Lord Henry as he educates his young charge. Whatever you do, make sure you do not read the ending of the book ahead of time, and do not discuss it with anyone else until you have finished the whole thing.


Web:

http://www.dagonbytes.com/thelibrary/dorgray/
http://www.hoboes.com/html/FireBlade/Wilde/dorian/
http://www.litrix.com/doriangr/doria001.htm


Pride and Prejudice

"It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune must be in want of a wife." Thus begins "Pride and Prejudice" (1813), an intelligent and perceptive romance for smart people, written by English novelist Jane Austen (1775-1817). "Pride and Prejudice" is the story of Elizabeth Bennet and her long, spirited courtship with Mr. Darcy, a seemingly cold and snobbish person who eventually proves himself to be a hero and a gentleman. Austen possesses a clever and funny writing style that, on the surface, seems spare and unemotional, which is why her books are still so popular (and make such good movies).


Web:

http://www.bibliomania.com/0/0/6/8/frameset.html
http://www.pemberley.com/janeinfo/pridprej.html


Robinson Crusoe

The English novelist Daniel Defoe (1660?-1731) wrote "Robinson Crusoe" when he was 58 years old. By then, Defoe had had a large variety of experiences, many of which showed up in the book. "Robinson Crusoe" tells the story of a headstrong 18-year-old who, against his parents' wishes, runs away to sea to seek adventure. He is captured by pirates who enslave him, but after two years, he manages to escape to what appears to be an uninhabited island (actually, it is inhabited by friendly black natives). Eventually, Crusoe is rescued. He then goes to Brazil where he acquires some plantations and starts a slave trading business. However, while at sea, his ship is wrecked, leaving him the only survivor on what, this time, really is an uninhabited island. Crusoe manages to save provisions from the ship, and does his best to recreate a proper English life. At first he is miserable, but eventually, he grows to enjoy the solitude and being master of his domain. After about 15 years, he sees a footprint in the sand (imagine how he feels!), and discovers that, from time to time, cannibals with prisoners come from the mainland in canoes. Several years later, when they return, Crusoe scares them away and rescues a young savage named Friday, who becomes Crusoe's servant, even to the extent of embracing Christianity. They live alone happily for two years, but eventually, other people join them on the island. Crusoe and Friday then travel to England, where Crusoe finds that, in his absence, his plantations have prospered and he is a wealthy man. In the fullness of time, Crusoe marries and has three children. Eventually, after his wife dies, Crusoe returns to sea. (Interesting note: in real life, Daniel Defoe was an unsuccessful, somewhat unscrupulous, businessman, who once cheated his own mother-in-law out of four hundred pounds in a cat-breeding scheme.)


Web:

http://www.bibliomania.com/0/0/17/31/frameset.html
http://www.learnlibrary.com/rob-crusoe/


Sherlock Holmes Stories

Between 1887 and 1927, the English author Arthur Conan Doyle (1859-1930) wrote fifty-six stories and four novels about the detective Sherlock Holmes. Holmes is the most recognizable character in English literature, and his stories have been read and re-read for over a hundred years. (I myself have read them multiple times.) The stories are narrated by Holmes' friend, Dr. John Watson, whose well-intentioned blundering provides a foil for Holmes' razor sharp intelligence and encyclopedic knowledge.


Web:

http://www.literature.org/authors/doyle-arthur-conan/
http://www.litrix.com/sec5.htm
http://www.tirkzilla.com/holmes/

Usenet:

Google Newsreader alt.fan.holmes


Tarzan

Did you know that Tarzan was actually an English aristocrat? Here is the story. An English couple is stranded on the west coast of Africa while the woman is pregnant. She gives birth to a son, and not long after, the couple dies. The young boy is raised by an ape and grows up to be Tarzan, the leader of the ape tribe. Eventually, he falls in love with an American, Jane Porter. Tarzan and Jane have a son and, with the help of the animals, Tarzan becomes king of the jungle. Over the course of 24 books, Tarzan evolves into an invincible hero who has many strange but exciting adventures. The Tarzan books (as well as two Tarzan stories just for children) were written by the American pulp writer, Edgar Rice Burroughs (1875-1950). Burroughs was also the author of many other adventure novels, including a series of stories taking place on Mars.


Web:

http://www.literature.org/authors/burroughs-edgar-rice/
http://www.ofcn.org/cyber.serv/resource/bookshelf/tarz3...
http://www.ofcn.org/cyber.serv/resource/bookshelf/tarz6...
http://www.ofcn.org/cyber.serv/resource/bookshelf/tarzn...


Time Machine

In 1895, H.G. Wells wrote his future-thinking book, "The Time Machine". It's a fantastic tale of a man who creates a machine with which he travels through time and visits the distant future. I am amazed at how well Wells was able to describe such a machine and cleverly contemplate the meaning and the mechanics of time travel. The book is relatively short and well worth the time.


Web:

http://www.literature.org/authors/wells-herbert-george/...
http://www.umich.edu/~umfandsf/other/ebooks/timem10.txt


War of the Worlds

In 1898, the English writer H.G. Wells (1866-1946) wrote a novel about a Martian invasion of Earth. On October 30, 1938, the American actor and producer Orson Welles put on a radio dramatization of "The War of The Worlds" that scared the daylights out of a great many credulous Americans. "No one would have believed," the book begins, "in the last years of the nineteenth century that this world was being watched keenly and closely by intelligences greater than man's and yet as mortal as his own..."


Web:

http://www.fourmilab.ch/etexts/www/warworlds/warw.html
http://www.literature.org/authors/wells-herbert-george/...


Wuthering Heights

"Wuthering Heights" was written in 1847 by the English novelist and poet Emily BrontŰ (1816-1855). The novel tells the disturbing story of destructive and obsessive love between two not-very-nice people (Catherine Earnshaw and the savage rebel Heathcliff), and the nice people whose lives they ruin.


Web:

http://www.bibliomania.com/0/0/9/16/frameset.html
http://www.literature.org/authors/bronte-emily/wutherin...