Harley Hahn
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Harley Hahn's
Emacs Field
Guide...

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List of Chapters
and Appendixes

Detailed Table
of Contents

Buying the Book

Endorsements

Lists of Command
Summaries

Indexes
Important topics
General
Key sequences
Variables and
Functions

Unix: Keys, Files
and Commands

Errors and
Corrections

Lists of Command Summaries

Harley Hahn's Emacs Field Guide contains 60 summaries of Emacs and Unix/Linux commands. For easy reference, when you are using the book Appendix B contains a full copy of all the command summaries.

To help you find what you want, this page contains two lists of the command summaries. The first list shows command summaries in the order they appear in the book. The second list shows the command summaries in alphabetical order. Once you find what you want, all you need to do is look it up within the text of the book or in Appendix B.

Lists of command summaries:

 • Order they appear in the book
 • Alphabetical order

Note: The first part of the figure number shows the chapter in which you will find the figure. For example, Figure 2‑4 is in Chapter 2; Figure 12‑8 is in Chapter 12.

    List of command summaries — Order they appear in the book
Figure 2‑4 Accessing a virtual terminal from the GUI.
Figure 2‑5 Changing from one virtual terminal to another.
Figure 2‑7 Keys to make corrections when typing a command.
Figure 2‑8 Key combinations to use when typing a command.
Figure 2‑9 Commands to use with less.
Figure 2‑10 Important directories in filesystem hierarchy standard.
Figure 2‑11 The most important file commands.
Figure 2‑12 The most important directory commands.
Figure 2‑13 Bash configuration files.
Figure 3‑1 Linux package management systems.
Figure 3‑2 BSD package management systems.
Figure 4‑1 Emacs names for special keys.
Figure 5‑1 Choosing to save files after stopping Emacs with C-x C-c.
Figure 6‑5 Status characters within the mode line.
Figure 6‑6 Completion commands.
Figure 6‑7 Choosing whether or not to run a disabled command.
Figure 7‑1 Keys to use while typing.
Figure 7‑2 Commands for controlling windows.
Figure 7‑3 Commands for controlling buffers.
Figure 7‑4 Commands for working with files.
Figure 8‑1 Commands for moving the cursor.
Figure 8‑2 Commands for moving cursor through a paragraph/sentence.
Figure 8‑3 Major modes to use when editing a human language.
Figure 8‑4 Prefix argument combinations.
Figure 8‑5 Commands to move throughout the buffer.
Figure 8‑6 Commands to use line numbers.
Figure 8‑8 Commands to set mark and define a region.
Figure 8‑9 Commands that act upon the region.
Figure 9‑1 Commands to delete text.
Figure 9‑2 Commands to kill text.
Figure 9‑3 Commands to move and kill by word or sentence.
Figure 9‑4 Commands to yank text.
Figure 9‑5 Commands for correcting common typing mistakes.
Figure 9‑6 Commands for correcting spelling mistakes.
Figure 9‑7 Commands to fill text.
Figure 10‑1 Search commands.
Figure 10‑2 Keys to use during a search.
Figure 10‑3 Non-incremental search commands.
Figure 10‑4 Search commands.
Figure 10‑5 Search commands for regular expressions.
Figure 10‑6 Characters to use with regular expressions.
Figure 10‑7 Search and replace commands.
Figure 10‑8 Responses during a search and replace command.
Figure 10‑9 Minimum keystrokes to invoke search/replace commands.
Figure 11‑2 The four basic major modes.
Figure 11‑3 Major modes: Fundamental mode family.
Figure 11‑4 Major modes: Text mode family.
Figure 11‑5 Major modes: Prog mode family.
Figure 11‑6 Major modes: Special mode family.
Figure 11‑7 Independent major modes.
Figure 11‑8 Minor modes.
Figure 11‑10Commands to set and describe modes.
Figure 12‑1 Running shell commands.
Figure 12‑2 Help facility options.
Figure 12‑3 General info commands.
Figure 12‑4 Info commands to select a node.
Figure 12‑5 Info commands to read a node.
Figure 12‑6 Built-in tools.
Figure 12‑7 Dired commands.
Figure 12‑8 Games and diversions.
    List of Command Summaries — Alphabetical Order
Figure 2‑4 Accessing a virtual terminal from the GUI.
Figure 2‑13 Bash configuration files.
Figure 3‑2 BSD package management systems.
Figure 12‑6 Built-in tools.
Figure 2‑5 Changing from one virtual terminal to another.
Figure 10‑6 Characters to use with regular expressions.
Figure 5‑1 Choosing to save files after stopping Emacs with C‑x C‑c.
Figure 6‑7 Choosing whether or not to run a disabled command.
Figure 7‑3 Commands for controlling buffers.
Figure 7‑2 Commands for controlling windows.
Figure 9‑5 Commands for correcting common typing mistakes.
Figure 9‑6 Commands for correcting spelling mistakes.
Figure 8‑2 Commands for moving cursor through a paragraph/sentence.
Figure 8‑1 Commands for moving the cursor.
Figure 7‑4 Commands for working with files.
Figure 8‑9 Commands that act upon the region.
Figure 9‑1 Commands to delete text.
Figure 9‑7 Commands to fill text.
Figure 9‑2 Commands to kill text.
Figure 9‑3 Commands to move and kill by word or sentence.
Figure 8‑5 Commands to move throughout the buffer.
Figure 11‑10Commands to set and describe modes.
Figure 8‑8 Commands to set mark and define a region.
Figure 8‑6 Commands to use line numbers.
Figure 2‑9 Commands to use with less.
Figure 9‑4 Commands to yank text.
Figure 6‑6 Completion commands.
Figure 12‑7 Dired commands.
Figure 4‑1 Emacs names for special keys.
Figure 12‑8 Games and diversions.
Figure 12‑3 General info commands.
Figure 12‑2 Help facility options.
Figure 2‑10 Important directories in filesystem hierarchy standard.
Figure 11‑7 Independent major modes.
Figure 12‑5 Info commands to read a node.
Figure 12‑4 Info commands to select a node.
Figure 2‑8 Key combinations to use when typing a command.
Figure 2‑7 Keys to make corrections when typing a command.
Figure 10‑2 Keys to use during a search.
Figure 7‑1 Keys to use while typing.
Figure 3‑1 Linux package management systems.
Figure 8‑3 Major modes to use when editing a human language.
Figure 11‑3 Major modes: Fundamental mode family.
Figure 11‑5 Major modes: Prog mode family.
Figure 11‑6 Major modes: Special mode family.
Figure 11‑4 Major modes: Text mode family.
Figure 10‑9 Minimum keystrokes to invoke search/replace commands.
Figure 11‑8 Minor modes.
Figure 10‑3 Non-incremental search commands.
Figure 8‑4 Prefix argument combinations.
Figure 10‑8 Responses during a search and replace command.
Figure 12‑1 Running shell commands.
Figure 10‑7 Search and replace commands.
Figure 10‑5 Search commands for regular expressions.
Figure 10‑4 Search commands.
Figure 10‑1 Search commands.
Figure 6‑5 Status characters within the mode line.
Figure 11‑2 The four basic major modes.
Figure 2‑12 The most important directory commands.
Figure 2‑11 The most important file commands.

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